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Thursday
May262016

Tips on conducting an excellent interview 

Nothing could be more important to being a good leader then building a great team. Nothing could be more important to building a great team than selecting the right people. Nothing could be more important to selecting the right people than doing a solid and thorough interview…several of them. Here is Brad Lomenick with ten tips for doing a great interview!

Originally posted by Brad Lomenick

Here are a few tips for conducting a great interview. 

1. Do your homework. You would be amazed how many people show up to do an interview and have no clue about who they are interviewing, and just try to wing it. It shows. Believe me.

2. Ask the question behind the question. Get under the surface. Dig deeper. Not to uncover gossip or something that is not relevant, but because someone has probably already asked the question you are thinking about asking. So ask a better one.

3. Be curious. Curiosity allows you to push into the unknown and follow the trail. Move towards the areas that both are interesting to you and the person across from you. 

4. Shutup. No one wants to hear your answer to the question, otherwise the tables would be turned. Your job is to pull great content out of the interviewee, not to give your opinion.

5. Create a conversation, not just a serve and volley. When appropriate, give the sense to your listeners that you are sitting in a living room having coffee and catching up. Creating conversation is different than just giving your opinion or an answer to your question. Conversations require context, which means you have to have 20 or 30 questions ready to go for an interview that would usually be around 10 questions.

6. Don't interrupt unless you need to, keep your hands off the table, and save your "ums" and "uh-huhs" and "oh-yeahs" for after you're done. For audio or video purposes, your agreeing by saying something just muddies the water. It seems like the thing to do in person- giving your interviewee verbal feedback, but just stick with non-verbal. Sounds better when you don't respond. And hitting or tapping the table is picked up by microphones- seems obvious, but everyone forgets.....

7. Listen. Seems obvious, but great interviewers actually listen to an answer being given, instead of preparing for the next question and not actually hearing what the person is saying. Listening creates great follow up questions. And creates trust with the interviewee.

8. Provide your questions beforehand. Send your questions to the person you are interviewing before the interview so they can prepare.

9. Study the best. Watch Charlie Rose, Bob Costas, Barbara Walters, Oprah, etc. Learn from their style.

10. Ask permission. On the front and back end. Make sure you always have permission to post something, and of course if someone doesn't want an answer included, make sure to delete it. Your job is to make sure you don't break their trust. 

 

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