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Tuesday
Feb032015

Things to consider when bringing on a new team member

Bringing someone new into your current team or staff, is a extremely important decision. It can make, or brake, the team or organization when it's the wrong person. 

As Jim Collins tells us, “Get the right people on the bus and in the right seats.” Here is Brad Lomenick with some excellent insight into identifying the right people.

Originally posted by Brad Lomenick

Nine Things To Consider When Hiring Someone New For The Team

1. Hire slow and fire fast. Many organizations are just the opposite, hiring fast and firing slow.

2. Look for heart and hands, not just mind and spirit.

3. Culture is key. As the leader, do you want to hang out with them? Hire people you want to be friends with. Should they be on the bus? Not necessarily what seat yet, but just figuring out if being on the bus is a good idea.

4. Don’t just interview them. “intern” them. This has been the system at Catalyst over the years.

5. Hire a doer, not just a talker. Lots of folks can wow you with their words. The question is can they wow you with their action.

6. Benchmark the Experts. Who are the best people in the world at the position you are hiring? Figure out who that is, and contact them. For advice, suggestions, and to understand why they are so good at what they do. Learn from them and build a job description for your new hire from that.

7. Be wary of the “stepping stone” mentality. If you are another stop on the journey for someone, then run. Reality is – people are transitioning all the time. But that shouldn’t be their mindset going in when hiring them.

8. Get outside the box with your interview process. Don’t just talk to them. Put them on a project, give them an assignment for an hour, have them do a scavenger hunt, make them pitch you on another person also interviewing, etc. Step out of your comfort zone, and make them step out as well.

9. Do your homework. Have potential team members take personality tests, talk to their references, and spend as much time as you can with them.

 

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