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Sunday
Jan262014

Eight Of The Hardest People To Lead

Now every person on planet earth has a little of one or more of these, but I’m talking about those who have it in spades. It dominates/colors everything they do and say to the extent that it significantly harms them and others.

1. The Overly Ambitious

His/her ego is writing checks the team can’t cash. They have an idea a minute and are upset when people fail to get excited about every idea they have.

2. The Unambitious

Flat out lazy with no God-sized dreams and goals. Would rather settle for mediocrity.

3. The Super Brilliant

They’re too smart for their own good. Brilliant when it come to talent, dismal when it comes to relationships and teamwork. They tend to be know-it-alls and have opinions on everything. I love what John Wooden says, “It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.

4. The Super Fast

They can run circles around most people and gets lots done in a short period of time, but nobody likes them, wants to work with them, or be around them. They are more interested in quantity than quality.

5. The Independent Operator

It’s their way or the highway. Can’t seem to be able to negotiate or compromise when it is called for. Always prefers to work alone rather than with others. Don't seem to even like other people.

6. The Complainer

A nick-picker of sorts with whom nothing is ever good or right enough. They always go straight to all the problems with ideas and people, but seldom offer solutions; Mr./Ms. Negativity.

7. The Hurting

Those with significant dysfunction who don’t seem to really want to get better, but just want to use the team and their supervisor as therapists. Now we all have problems and issues just because we are alive; but I am thinking of those who don’t/won’t lean into the Gospel or take responsibility for their lives and their future. It’s always somebody else’s fault. They perhaps really don’t want help but pity.

8. The Traditionalist

Takes conventionality to a new level. Never interested in trying new things or new ways of doing old things. The champion of “This is the way we’ve always done it, and 'if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it'.” They view change as a threat rather than an opportunity,.

+ What would you add to the list? Whom have you found it difficult to lead, work with, or for?

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